Morse Code, Music & Art

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 5.30.57 PM.png

Ontology Tags

Classes Arts & Entertainment: (1) Impact of Technology – Technology-based Art (2) Mirror of Society – Music as a Form of Communication | Health & Health Services: Health Breakthroughs – Alternate Forms of Communication | Conflict & Defense: Defense & Foreign Policy – Strategies & Communication

Goals  Challenging Problems: Questions – Assist Others | Intended Learning Outcomes: Communication – Decipher Attitudes, Intentions, Values | CTEs & Disciplines: (1) Communication / Media – (a) Nonverbal Communication  (b) Speech Communication & Translation  (2) History – National History

 

About Morse Code

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 3.52.24 PM.png

Activity – Morse Code Messaging

Every kid loves the idea of a secret code – especially if it means leaving parents out of the loop. Whether it’s Pig Latin, invisible ink, or the impenetrable “txt msg,” secret codes rule when it comes to passing on very important information. But kids may not know that secret codes have a long and exciting history, from top-secret military matters to computer programming to cryptic criminal cases. One of the most important code systems invented is the internationally-recognized Morse code, which matches dots and dashes to letters of the alphabet.

 

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 4.22.10 PM.png

Morse Code & the Telegraph

Developed in the 1830s and 1840s by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) and other inventors, the telegraph revolutionized long-distance communication. It worked by transmitting electrical signals over a wire laid between stations.

 

Learn Morse Code

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 4.08.41 PM.png

Learn Morse Code

While Morse code is not widely used today, it’s still recognized. The U.S. Navy and Coast Guard still signal using Morse code. It’s also found in amateur radio and aviation… It’s also an alternate means of communication for persons who can’t speak or use their hands (e.g., paralysis or stroke victims may use eye blinks). Even if you have no real need to know the code, learning and using Morse code is fun.

How to Learn Morse Code

Learning Morse Code is just like learning a new brand new language and as such needs a plan of attack and practice. Here are some ideas and tips. Includes a great chart for visual learners.

YouTube.png

Learn Morse Code (in 15 minutes) from a Memory Champ

Morse Code Alphabet Video

 

Create Morse Code Messages

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 4.11.42 PM.png

Morse Code Translator

Send a message to your friends in Morse code by email, Facebook or any other network by sharing a link.

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 5.25.31 PM.png

Hello Morse

As part of Google Chrome’s Experiment with Google — A collection of AI and Chrome experiments inspired by Morse code on Android Gboard.

 

Morse Code & Music

Learn how music and music notation can be used as a form of communication. Choose an instrument or other method of making sound. Create a question and answer game, exchanging short phrases with your partner using Morse Code. Create a melody, or borrow words from your favorite music, translate it into Morse Code and see if your friends can interpret the code!

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 5.12.07 PM.png

How Morse Code Has Made Its Mark in Music

Surprisingly, there is another area of modern life which has also been affected by the use of Morse Code. And that’s the world of popular music.

Hiding a Morse Code Message in a Pop Song

The Code: A Declassified and Unbelievable Hostage Rescue Story

How the Colombian army sent a hidden message to hostages…using a pop song.

The Rhythm of the Code

Official original Morse Code Music ” The Rhythm of the Code” YouTube video.

 

Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 6.14.43 PM.png

Morse Code & Art

Morse Code + Sound Waves = Really Cool Art

See how artist Amy Thompson incorporates Morse Code and sound waves into her latest piece inside the newly constructed TELUS Garden in Downtown Vancouver.

Morse Code As a Method For Drawing

GET INVOLVED! Do you know of vetted content that complements this page? Let us know at admin@pbllounge.org and we’ll identify you as the contributor.